Mannan and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine protect intestinal mucosa of celiac patients with active disease from in vitro toxicity of gliadin peptides

Salvatore Auricchio, Giorgio De Ritis, Massimo De Vincenzi, Giuseppe Magazzù, Luigi Maiuri, Elena Mancini, Maurizio Minetti, Orazio Sapora, Vittorio Silano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wheat flour and other cereals toxic for celiac patients contain an alcohol-soluble protein fraction that, under experimental conditions simulating in vivo protein digestion, yields peptides that agglutinate undifferentiated K 562(S) cells. In contrast, cereals well tolerated in celiac disease (i.e., rice and maize) do not. Furthermore, purified A-gliadin peptides that damage in vitro-cultured flat celiac mucosa are powerful agglutinins for K 562(S) cells, whereas A-gliadin peptides that do not show any adverse in vitro effect on celiac intestine lack agglutinating activity. Mannan, acetylglucosamine, and its oligomers (N,N′-diacetylchitobiose and N,N′,N″-triacetylchitotriose) were able to prevent and reverse cell agglutination induced by peptides from all the toxic cereals. Moreover, mannan and N,N′,N″-striacetylchitotriose exhibited a protective effect on intestinal mucosa specimens of patients with active celiac disease cultured with wheat protein-derived peptides. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the agglutinating and toxic peptides are bound by carbohydrates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)973-978
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume99
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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